Internal Displacement Update
Issue 10: 26 January - 8 February 2017

Issue 10 map
Feature

Yemen

Affected areas

Taiz governorate

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 32,000 new displacements; about 41,000 besieged in early February

Context

About 5,300 families (32,000 people) in Taiz governorate were displaced by intense fighting in and around Al Mukha city between Al Houthi and pro-government forces. People fled to other districts within Taiz governorate or to neighbouring Al Hudaydah governorate. About 41,000 people were trapped in Al Mashaleeha, Al Zahari and Al Mukha areas as roads were closed. Intense airstrikes continued to target other coastal districts where some internally displaced people (IDPs) were located, triggering renewed displacement. Authorities at a health unit said some IDPs arriving at Al Khawkhah had wounds caused by airstrikes and gun shots. Most displaced families fled with few possessions and were staying with relatives, putting pressure on host families (ECHO, 7 February 2017).

A Norwegian Refugee Council report said: “Displaced people face a number of hardships, including lack of access to water, healthcare, shelter, education and a basic income. Still, 75 per cent identify food as their top priority among all these, illustrating the immediate and desperate need, a daily struggle for survival.” Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary General Jan Egeland said: “Since the conflict started, all the warring parties have impeded our ability to reach people who were in most need of humanitarian assistance. It is crucial that all restrictions on aid are lifted so that we are able to deliver life-saving services throughout Yemen … In Yemen, if bombs don’t kill you, a slow and painful death by starvation is now an increasing threat.” (Norwegian Refugee Council, 8 February 2017).

Latin America and the Caribbean

Chile

Affected areas

Biobío, La Araucanía, Maule and O’Higgins regions

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Wildfires)

Figures

At least 5,400 new displacements between 15 January and 6 February

Context

At least 5,400 people registered as displaced with the authorities because their houses were destroyed by wildfires that started on 15 January and grew rapidly towards the end of the month (ONEMI, 6 February 2017). On 3 February, the state of disaster was still in place in Biobío, La Araucanía, Maule and O’Higgins regions. The entire town of Santa Olga, in Maule region, which had a population of 4,500, was destroyed (ECHO, 3 February 2017).

Peru

Affected areas

Most of the country

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Floods, landslides)

Figures

About 32,000 new displacements between 24 January and 7 February

Context

About 32,000 people were displaced by floods, landslides and mudslides after intense rain, hail, snow and thunderstorms in late January that led the government to declare a state of emergency (INDECI, 26 January 2017; TRT World, 28 January 2017; INDECI, 6 February 2017).

Middle East and North Africa

Iran

Affected areas

Sistan and Baluchestan province

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Floods)

Figures

About 8,200 new displacements between 24 and 28 January

Context

About 2,400 families (8,200 people) were displaced by floods after unusually heavy rain in Sistan and Baluchestan province in late January. People from six villages in the path of the floods were evacuated. The floods damaged more than 1,600 mudbrick homes across 700 villages (PressTV, 28 January 2017). About 1,100 displaced families (5,500 people) stayed in emergency shelters and tents provided by the Red Crescent. The rain follows a severe drought in the south-eastern province, which has a desert climate, long hot summers and an annual rainfall of less than 105 millimetres (Financial Tribune, 28 January 2017).

Iraq

Affected areas

Mosul

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 154,000 new displacements between 17 October and 7 February; 4,800 returns between 27 January and 2 February

Context

About 154,000 people were displaced from Mosul by fighting between the Iraqi army and Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) for control of the city between 17 October and 7 February (IOM automated dashboard, 7 February 2017). While small numbers of IDPs were displaced again from north-eastern neighbourhoods of Mosul on the banks of the Tigris river because of indirect fire from the western bank, a larger number, about 4,800 people, returned from Khazer and Hassan Sham camps to their homes in eastern Mosul between 27 January and 2 February (OCHA, 5 February 2017).

Syria

Affected areas

Locations including Aleppo, Rural Damascus and Raqqa governorates

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 25,000 new displacements and returns from Raqqa between early

Context

An estimated 25,000 people were displaced by the second phase of the offensive by the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) to take Raqqa from ISIL between early December and late January. They were displaced for an average of four days, then returned to their places of origin (UNHCR, 25 January 2017).

Up to 18,000 people displaced from Wadi Barada valley in Rural Damascus by fighting between 23 December and 28 January received permission to return home or evacuate to Idlib (OCHA, 30 January 2017). In addition, about 2,100 opposition fighters and family members were evacuated from Wadi Barada on 29 January. Some IDPs stayed in rural Hama governorate where they had relatives, while most of them went to northern Idlib governorate (UNHCR, 2 February 2017).

South Asia

Afghanistan

Affected areas

Almost all provinces

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Avalanches); Conflict

Figures

About 600 new displacements between 4 and 7 February; about 6,200 returns from Iran and Pakistan between 29 January and 4 February

Context

About 600 people were displaced when avalanches, snow and rain destroyed their houses between 4 and 7 February, with 22 out of 34 provinces affected (OCHA, 8 February 2017).

About 6,200 undocumented Afghans returned from Iran and Pakistan between 29 January and 4 February. The total number of such returns from Iran between 1 January and 4 February is now 36,000. The number of returns from Pakistan during the same period is 7,000 (IOM, 4 February 2017).

Sub-Saharan Africa

South Sudan

Affected areas

Eastern Nile, Upper Nile, Wau states

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 22,000 secondary displacements between 25 January and 3 February; between 2,000 and 4,000 new displacements between 26 January and 3 February 2017

Context

About 20,000 registered IDPs and about 2,000 unregistered IDPs fled fighting between government and opposition forces near Wau Shilluk in Upper Nile state and Malakal in Eastern Nile state between 25 January and 3 February. Most people fled north to Kodok, Lul, Padiet and Pathaw (OCHA, 3 February 2017).

Between 2,000 and 4,000 newly displaced people arrived in Wau city in Wau state between 26 January and 3 February because of clashes between cattle farmers and armed forces in the Jur river region, south-east of Wau city. More than 43,000 IDPs were already sheltering in Wau city, including 29,000 at the UNMISS protected area and 8,500 at the Catholic cathedral (OCHA, 3 February 2017).

Notes For the purposes of this update, refugee and IDP returns do not imply the achievement of a durable solution. The terminology, names and designations used in this update and the material in links do not imply any opinion on the part of IDMC.
Displacement figures reported here are indicative only and have been rounded to the nearest 10 (if the figure is less than 999), 100 (if the figure is less than 10,000) or 1,000 (if the figure is 10,000 or larger).
The IDU gives priority to displacement flows that occurred or were reported in stated period. However, due to reliance on third party sources, certain entries may include information that refers to an earlier reporting period. For the purposes of this update, refugee and IDP returns do not imply the achievement of a durable solution. For IDMC-validated and peer-reviewed figures, read our Global Report on Internal Displacement.