Internal Displacement Update
Issue 15: 6 - 19 April 2017

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Feature

Iraq

Affected areas

Anbar and Nineveh governorates

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

331,000 new displacements between 17 October 2016 and 18 April 2017: 11,000 returns to eastern Mosul between 7 and 13 April

Context

About 331,000 people were displaced between 17 October 2016 and 18 April 2017 from Mosul, mostly to Ninewa governorate (IOM, 18 April 2017).

About 11,000 IDPs returned to their places of origin between 7 and 13 April, which is twice as many as in the previous week. Most, about 7,600, left camps east and north-east of Mosul. Among the returnees, some IDPs originally from western Mosul decided to wait in eastern Mosul for their places of origin to become accessible. Reasons to move included information from relatives that the security situation in eastern Mosul was stable, severe movement restrictions in camps, and wishing to reunite with relatives, resume work and avoid difficult living conditions in tents as the weather became hotter (UNHCR, 13 April 2017).

Satellite imagery and other research shows more than 1,100 houses were destroyed in Mosul, mostly in western Mosul since 19 February along with extensive damage to infrastructure, public facilities and private buildings. Damage to residential buildings in western Mosul is two and a half times greater than in eastern Mosul (UNHCR, 13 April 2017).

Several hundred IDPs crossed the flooded Tigris river in small wooden boats because flooding closed bridges, slowing the outflow of IDPs from western Mosul to the IDP reception, screening and transit site of Hammam al-Alil, and humanitarian access to Hammam al-Alil (Reuters, 16 April 2017UNHCR, 17 April 2017).

Dozens of families originally from ISIL-controlled districts of Qaim, Ramadi and Fallujah and now displaced to Heet district in Anbar province face forcible eviction because the authorities and some residents accuse them of terrorism or collaboration with ISIL. One displaced man said: "My cousin had joined ISIS (Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant or ISIL) and was later killed in military operations. ISIS bombed my house because I refused to join them. But that wasn't enough to convince the authorities in Heet that we are victims of these events and that we are not terrorists” (IOHR, 8 April 2017).

East Asia and Pacific

Indonesia

Affected areas

Aceh and East Kalimantan provinces, Java island

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Landslides following heavy rains, floods)

Figures

More than 8,000 new displacements in the first half of April

Context

At least 8,000 people were displaced by flash floods, flooding and the threat of or actual landslides or mud and debris after heavy rain during the first half of April across many parts of Indonesia. More than 340 people were evacuated in Dayakan village in East Java province before 11 April (BNPB, 11 April 2017).

About 2,200 people (600 households) were evacuated after houses in five villages in Jombang in East Java were flooded after the Gunting river overflowed in early April (AHA Centre, 8 April 2017). More than 170 people from Cipinang Melayu in East Jakarta city took shelter at the sub-district office on 11 April or in several houses of worship. They fled hours after the nearby Sunter reservoir overflowed after heavy rain (The Jakarta Post, 12 April 2017). Two thousand people were evacuated because of flooding in Samarinda city in East Kalimantan province between 3 and 9 April. About 270 people were evacuated by the Cilegon authorities because of flooding (ASEAN, 9 April 2017). About 2,500 people were temporarily evacuated because of a landslide that damaged 300 houses after days of torrential rain in Southeast Aceh regency on 11 April (OCHA, 17 April 2017).

Japan

Affected areas

Kumamoto prefecture

Cause of displacement

Anniversary of disaster (Earthquake)

Figures

About 42,000 displaced as of April 2017

Context

About 42,000 people are still displaced, one year after magnitude 6.2 and 7.0 earthquakes on 14 and 16 April 2016 damaged 160,000 houses, offices and stores in Kumamoto prefecture.  About 11,000 people still live in 4,200 temporary dwellings, while another 31,000 people live in commercial apartments and other housing offered free of charge by municipalities to quake survivors. Although 180,000 people had evacuated immediately after the disaster, all shelters closed by November (Japan Times, 13 April 2017).

Philippines

Affected areas

Batangas, Bohol and Samar provinces, Central Visayas region

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Earthquakes; Low pressure area); Conflict

Figures

About 30,000 new displacements between 8 and 16 April (earthquake); about 6,800 displacements between 15 and 18 April (low pressure area); more than 11,000 new displacements (conflict) between 11 and 15 April; about 3,400 returns (conflict) on 11 April

Context

About 30,000 people were displaced by magnitude 5.6 and 6.0 earthquakes on 8 April near Babini in Batangas province. About 3,600 remained displaced as of 19 April, with 13 families (52 people) staying in an evacuation centre and 3,500 with friends or family (DROMIC, 19 April 2017).

About 6,800 people from Central Visayas region were displaced by tropical depression Crising which weakened into a low pressure area after making landfall on 15 April (DROMIC, 18 April 2017).

About 3,000 families (about 15,000 people) were displaced between 11 and 19 April by armed conflict between the military, police and Abu Sayyaf, a group allied to ISIL, in Inabanga in Bohol province on 11 April. More than 12,000 people stayed in evacuation centres, and 2,700 with family or friends. About 3,100 remained displaced as of 19 April (DROMIC, 19 April 2017). Soldiers and the provincial police clashed with rebels on the island of Bohol, about 400 miles south of Manila, after spotting 10 armed members of Abu Sayyaf on three boats (New York Times, 11 April 2017).

About 840 families (about 3,600 people) displaced by conflict on 4 April returned to their homes in Calbiga in Samar province at an unspecified time on or before 11 April. They had evacuated to a basketball court in fear of being caught in the crossfire between the armed forces and members of the New People’s Army, the armed wing of the Communist Party. In the group were 930 children, 35 pregnant women, six people with a disability and 110 older people. “The local government tried to move the displaced locals into evacuation centres. However, the community residents declined the offer and rallied for the pull out of the military… which the local government granted” (DSWD, 11 April 2017).

Latin America and the Caribbean

Colombia

Affected areas

Caldas, Norte de Santander and Putumayo departments

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Mudslides); Conflict

Figures

More than 3,400 new displacements between 1 and 16 April (disaster); 450 new displacements on 2 and 6 April (conflict)

Context

More than 3,400 people were displaced to 13 formal shelters or spontaneous settlements between 1 and 16 April after the Mocoa, Mulato and Sancoyaco rivers burst their banks, triggering a major landslide in Mocoa city in Putumayo department on 1 April (actalliance, 16 April 2017).

About 300 people (90 families) were displaced to Zaragoza and Potrero Grande in El Carmen municipality in Norte de Santander department on 2 April due to an operation by the police and military against Ejército de Liberación Nacional (ELN or National Liberation Army) that started on 1 April. The group included 90 children, 95 women and 30 older people. Some displaced people have already started returning (OCHA, 6 April 2017). 

About 150 people (49 families) fled from Monte Tarra, in Hacari municipality in Norte de Santander, because of attacks against a military unit and subsequent fighting between the military and the ELN. People fled to different parts of the same municipality. By 17 April, most people had returned (OCHA 18 April 2017).

Ecuador

Affected areas

Manabí and Esmeraldas provinces

Cause of displacement

Anniversary of disaster (Earthquake)

Figures

About 3,600 people displaced as of 7 April

Context

About 3,600 people still live in 15 shelters (10 in Manabí and 5 in Esmeraldas provinces) one year after a magnitude 7.8 earthquake struck. By 3 April, the Ministry of Housing had built 23,000 houses and planned to build another 12,000 (El Universo, 13 April 2017). The earthquake, which struck on 16 April 2016, was the most destructive in 70 years and left 80,000 without homes and livelihoods (International Fund for Agricultural Development, 19 April 2017).

Middle East and North Africa

Syria

Affected areas

Idlib, Raqqa and Rural Damascus governorates

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 26,000 new displacements between 1 March and 17 April

Context

About 26,000 people were displaced between 1 March and 17 April from Raqqa governorate as a result of the third phase of Operation Euphrates Wrath, an attempt by Kurdish militia the YPG (or People’s Protection Units), to take Raqqa from ISIL. Of the total, 23,000 people were displaced inside the governorate with the rest moving to communities in Aleppo, Deir ez-Zor, Hasakeh or Idlib governorates. Displacement patterns observed during the first and second phases of Euphrates Wrath continue, with most people opting for temporary and local displacement over fleeing to far areas (OCHA, 8 April 2017UNHCR, 17 April 2017).

About 130 evacuees including 60 children were killed and many more evacuees wounded when their bus convoy leaving Foah and Kefraya villages in Idlib governorate was bombed on 15 April. In exchange for people leaving the pro-government villages of Foua and Kefraya, which were besieged by non-government forces, an unknown number of other people were evacuated from the opposition-held towns of Zabadani and Madaya where they were under siege by pro-government forces (VOA, 16 April 2017Reuters, 19 April 2017).

On 12 April, Syrian government forces and armed opposition groups began implementing a deal to evacuate the towns of Foah, Kefraya and, in Rural Damascus governorate, Madaya and Zabadani. This agreement could lead to thousands of people leaving the four besieged towns (UNHCR, 13 April 2017).

North America

US

Affected areas

Florida

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Wildfires)

Figures

At least 2,000 new displacements on 22 April

Context

At least 2,000 people were forced to evacuate on 22 April as three separate wildfires raged across parts of Florida, burning homes. Mandatory evacuations were in effect for more than 6,000 structures in Collier county and 800 homes in central Florida's Polk county. The evacuation order was lifted later in the day (ABC News, 23 April).

South Asia

Afghanistan

Affected areas

Northern, southern, eastern and central provinces

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 16,000 new displacements between 9 and 15 April; about 21,000 returns between 9 and 15 April

Context

About 8,400 people fled Bilcheragh district in Faryab province because of clashes between government forces and non-state armed groups between 9 and 15 April. Eight-hundred and forty people fled from Darzab to Shiberghan in Jowzjan province for the same reason between 9 and 15 (OCHA, 15 April 2017).

About 2,800 people were displaced by military operations and airstrikes from Nesh to Dand in Kandahar province and from Nawae to Barakzaiy in Helmand province between 9 and 15 April (OCHA, 15 April 2017).

About 1,200 people were displaced by clashes between government forces and non-state armed groups from Alingar, Alishang and Dawlatshah to Mehtarlam in Laghman province between 9 and 15 April.

About 650 people were displaced by cross-border shelling and artillery to Khas Kunar between 9 and 15 April (OCHA, 15 April 2017).

About 2,400 people were displaced by fighting between government forces and non-state armed groups from Khoshi, Charkh and Baraki Barak districts to Pul-e-Alam and Mohammad Agha districts in Logar province between 9 and 15 April (OCHA, 15 April 2017).

About 13,000 undocumented Afghans returned through Milak border crossing in Nimroz province from Iran between 9 and 15 April. This brings the total number of returns from Iran between 1 January and 15 April to about 88,000. About 8,400 undocumented Afghans returned through Torkham and Spin Boldak crossings from Pakistan between 9 and 15 April. This brings the total number of such returns to more than 33,000 (IOM, 15 April 2017).

India

Affected areas

Bihar state

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Flood)

Figures

About 3,000 people still displaced as of April 2017

Context

Around 3,000 people displaced during floods in August 2008 are still living on embankments, near railway tracks and in temporary shelters in Katihar district in Bihar state as of April 2017. The displaced people are mainly older people, women and children left behind by migrant workers who work in other states. IDPs have had “agitations, hunger strikes and marches” to demand a solution but the district administration launched an “anti-encroachment drive” against them. The Kosi flood followed leaks in a man-made dam embankment (Land Conflict Watch, 19 April 2017). More than one million people were evacuated in 2008, with 440,000 people living in 360 relief camps in 2010 (UNDP, June 2010).

Nepal

Affected areas

Many parts of the country

Cause of displacement

Anniversary of disaster (Earthquakes)

Figures

About 2.6 million people still displaced as of 24 April 2017

Context

About 2.6 million people displaced by a magnitude 7.8 earthquake on 25 April 2015 and thousands of aftershocks were still living in temporary shelter as of 24 April, two years after the disaster. The earthquakes displaced an estimated 2.8 million people (HRRP, 24 April 2017).

Sri Lanka

Affected areas

Near Colombo

Cause of displacement

Disaster/Technological hazard

Figures

About 1,700 new displacements on about 14 April

Context

About 1,700 people were displaced to temporary shelters in state schools when a mountain of garbage near Colombo collapsed following heavy rain the previous day and a fire hours earlier (Inquirer, 17 April 2017). Many residents had evacuated 145 homes before the collapse because of the heavy rain (The Australian, 15 April 2017The Star, 15 April 2017).

The mound collapsed after naturally occurring methane gas exploded (New York Times, 17 April 2017).

Sub-Saharan Africa

Central African Republic

Affected areas

Mambéré-Kadei, Mbomou, Nana-Gribizi, Ouaka and Ouham Péndé prefectures

Cause of displacement

Conflict, Disaster (Flood; Fire)

Figures

About 13,000 new conflict displacements between 19 March and 4 April; about 560 new disaster displacements on 28 March; about 20,000 new conflict displacements on or after 4 April; about 5,000 secondary displacements on 5 April

Context

About 10,000 people were displaced in Bambari town in Ouaka prefecture between 19 March and 4 April because of an increase in clashes between armed groups. Most IDPs came from along the road from Bambari to Ippy and stayed with host families in the neighbourhoods of Centre-Ville, Mbagolo and Mbrepou.

About 2,600 people fled Bakouma sub-prefecture in Mbomou prefecture, into the bush after armed confrontations on 20 March.

An unspecified number of people moved back and forth in neighbourhoods in Kouango town in Ouaka prefecture between 30 March and 10 April in fear of an escalation of tension between two local communities (OCHA, 10 April 2017).

About 120 households (560 people with 180 women, 170 men and 210 children) lost their houses in Yongneguene village in Mambéré-Kadei prefecture on 28 March due to flooding triggered by heavy rain (OCHA, 10 April 2017).

About 20,000 people were displaced following an attack by armed men from the Mouvement Patriotique pour la Centrafrique (MPC or Patriotic Movement for the Central African Republic), a splinter group from the former Seleka military alliance, in Ngaoundaye and Bang localities, in Ouham Péndé prefecture, on 4 April (OCHA, 10 April 2017RFI, 5 April 2017).

About 5,000 people displaced by conflict were displaced again on 5 April when fire destroyed their shelters at a site for IDPs near the MINUSCA base in Kaga Bandoro town in Nana-Gribizi prefecture. People moved to other neighbourhoods and Lazare camp. More than 400 families intend to return to their neighbourhoods of origin if these can be secured by international forces (OCHA, 10 April 2017).

As of 6 April, there were 57,000 IDPs in Bambari town and 78,000 in Ouaka prefecture as a whole (OCHA, 10 April 2017).

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Affected areas

Kasaï region, Maniema and South Kivu province

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 1,800 new displacements on 3 April; more than 57,000 new and secondary displacements between 6 and 8 April

Context

About 1,800 people were displaced by clashes in Katupa village in Maniema province between members of the Pygmy, and the Bafuliu and Banyamulenge communities on 3 April. Local residents and IDPs from Tanganyika fled to South Kivu province fearing for their security (OCHA, 11 April 2017).

More than 57,000 people were displaced in Mweka and Luebo territories in Kasaï province on 6 April. About 200 people were displaced in Luilu area in Kasaï-Oriental on 8 April. Both displacements were because of the risk of attacks on villages and clashes between the army and militias. “Dynamics of multiple and pendular displacements are observed, depending on the areas where conflicts between militias and armed groups erupt. In some towns, such as Luebo (Kasaï), the population chose to stay at home and submit to the authority of militias, whereas local authorities have fled the area” (OCHA, 12 April 2017).

Malawi

Affected areas

Karonga district

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Floods)

Figures

About 23,000 new displacements between 1 and 6 April

Context

More than 5,500 families (about 23,000 people) were displaced in Chief Kyungu, Wasambo, Kilupula and Mwirang’ombe regions in Karonga district because of floods on 4 April after heavy rain (Floodlist, 7 April 2017ECHO, 6 April 2017).

Somalia

Affected areas

Most areas

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Drought)

Figures

More than 59,000 new displacements from 1 to 14 April

Context

More than 59,000 people were displaced directly or indirectly in relation to drought between 1 and 14 April, mostly within Bay administrative region or from Lower Shabelle region to the capital, Mogadishu. Most of the massive, drought-related displacement is from rural to urban areas or within rural areas where people expect to receive aid. March had the highest movement of people. More than 599,000 people were displaced by drought between November 2016 and 14 April (UNHCR, 14 April 2017).

April marks the official start of the gu rainy season and there was moderate rainfall in first two weeks of April in parts of Somaliland and the southern regions of Somalia. No significant rain was reported in Puntland. Rain provided some immediate relief and increased water levels in some parts of the Shabelle river but it also increased the risk of waterborne diseases, in particular in new settlements for IDPs that lack adequate water and sanitation. Many water sources are contaminated as people gather around displacement settlements and urban areas (OCHA, 16 April 2017).

South Sudan

Affected areas

Jonglei and Wau states

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 117,000 new and repeated displacements in mid-April

Context

About 100,000 people were displaced in Jonglei state in the second week of April as a government offensive swept through multiple villages, including in areas where fighting had flared up in late February. Many people displaced in February were displaced again. More than 17,000 people sought shelter in displacement sites in Wau town because of clashes and killings in and around the town from 10 April after earlier clashes in Greater Baggari county. Clashes in Wau town, including near the Nazareth church displacement site, killed at least 16 civilians (OCHA, Humanitarian Bulletin, 20 April 2017).

Notes For the purposes of this update, refugee and IDP returns do not imply the achievement of a durable solution. The terminology, names and designations used in this update and the material in links do not imply any opinion on the part of IDMC.
Displacement figures reported here are indicative only and have been rounded to the nearest 10 (if the figure is less than 999), 100 (if the figure is less than 10,000) or 1,000 (if the figure is 10,000 or larger).
The IDU gives priority to displacement flows that occurred or were reported in stated period. However, due to reliance on third party sources, certain entries may include information that refers to an earlier reporting period. For the purposes of this update, refugee and IDP returns do not imply the achievement of a durable solution. For IDMC-validated and peer-reviewed figures, read our Global Report on Internal Displacement.