Internal Displacement Update
Issue 17: 4 - 17 May

Issue 17 map
Feature

Syria

Affected areas

Raqqa governorate

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

More than 66,000 new displacements in April

Context

More than 66,000 people were newly displaced in Raqqa governorate between 1 and 30 April. This increase in displacements is a result of the ongoing Euphrates Wrath operation led by Syrian Democratic Forces against Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant. Previous displacement patterns continue, with the majority of the newly displaced, over 61,000, remaining locally within Raqqa. Others fled to Deir ez-Zor, Aleppo, Idleb and Hama governorates (OCHA, 6 May 2017). Restrictions on freedom of movement continue in transit centres and camps for IDPs, where identity documents are confiscated upon entry. Complex and inconsistent exit screening procedures have led to unnecessary delays of IDPs trying to move onwards. Two child fatalities were reported in Jib al Shaair camp, due to difficulties in medical referral and evacuation (OCHA, 6 May 2017).

Europe and Central Asia

Kyrgyzstan

Affected areas

Batken and Osh provinces

Cause of displacement

Disaster

Figures

About 3,100 new displacements between 3 and 8 May

Context

About 3,100 people were displaced between 3 and 8 May following  earthquakes on 3 and 5 May, and aftershocks that destroyed about 540 houses and severely damaged around 240 houses. The epicentres of the first magnitude 5.9 and the second magnitude 5.8 quakes were in Tajikistan near the border with Kyrgyzstan and had a depth of 10 kilometres.  In Kyrgyzstan, both Chong Alay district in Osh province and Kadamjai in Batken province suffered major damage (IFRC, 16 May 2017, on file with IDMC).

Latin America and the Caribbean

Colombia

Affected areas

Antioquia, Caldas, Cauca, Chocó, Córdoba, Nariño, Norte de Santander, Risaralda and Valle del Cauca departments

Cause of displacement

Conflict, Disaster

Figures

About 6,900 new conflict displacements between January and April; more than 8,600 new disaster displacements between 8 and 17 May

Context

About 6,900 people, including 1,000 children and adolescents, were displaced between January and April in Cauca, Chocó, Nariño and Norte de Santander departments because of armed violence. This four month figure represents 63 per cent of the total IDPs registered during the whole of 2016, and is a 20 per cent increase over the same period in 2016.

Seventy-one per cent of people displaced by violence between January and April 2017 were from indigenous or African Colombian communities.

As many as 27,000 people faced mobility restrictions or constraints due to armed violence in the January to April period, and about 1,250 were effectively confined due to the severity of these constraints in the Valle del Cauca and Cauca departments (OCHA, 8 May 2017).

At least 8,600 people were displaced due to flooding between 8 and 17 May, many to temporary evacuation centres in the Antioquia, Caldas, Córdoba, Risaralda and Valle del Cauca departments (Caracol Radio, 11 May 2017; Caracol Radio, 13 May 2017; Caracol Radio, 17 May 2017; El Espectador, 12 May 2017; El Tiempo, 13 May 2017; OCHA, 9 May 2017; RCN Radio, 13 May 2017).

The flooding coincides with the annual rainy season, aggravated by la Niña in the Pacific. Fearing overflowing rivers, avalanches and mudslides, 17 of Colombia’s 32 governors declared a red alert (Colombia Reports, 16 May 2017). As many as 310 municipalities and 15 departments were affected by the flooding (REDHUM, 16 May 2017).

South Asia

Afghanistan

Affected areas

Badghis, Baghlan, Ghazni, Ghor, Helmand, Herat, Kandahar, Kapisa, Kunduz, Laghman, Nangarhar and Uruzgan provinces

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 7,900 new displacements and about 2,100 returns between 7 and 13 May; about 128,000 cross-border returns from Iran between 1 January and 14 May; more than 4,400 cross-border returns from Pakistan between 1 January and 14 May

Context

About 300 people were displaced following clashes between the Afghan national security forces and non-state armed groups in Baghlan province between 7 and 13 May. 

About 700 people were displaced within Uruzgan province and an unconfirmed number in Helmand province, as clashes intensified across the region between 7 and 13 May.

About 1,000 people were displaced by border skirmishes between Afghan and Pakistani forces in Kandahar province between 7 and 13 May.

About 4,200 people were displaced from Chaparhar within Nangarhar province due to clashes between non-state armed group between 7 and 13 May. About 2,100 people displaced at an earlier date by Afghan and international military operations had returned to their homes in Kot, Nangarhar province between 7 and 13 May.

About 1,000 people were displaced within Laghman province following heightened insecurity.

About 30 people were displaced by armed clashes between government forces and non-state armed groups in Kapisa province between 7 and 13 May.

An additional 700 IDPs were identified in Nangarhar, Baghlan, Kunduz and Ghazni provinces between 7 and 13 May.

About 8,000 people were displaced within Badghis, Ghor and Herat provinces, in western Afghanistan, between 1 January and 14 May. In total, more than 91,000 people were displaced by conflict across 29 provinces in Afghanistan between 1 January and 14 May.

About 128,000 undocumented Afghans returned from Iran between 1 January and 14 May.

More than 4,400 undocumented Afghans returned through Torkham border crossing from Pakistan between 7 and 13 May. This is a 24 per cent decrease from the previous week as the Spin boldak and Chaman border was closed on 5 May following border skirmishes between Afghan and Pakistani forces. Continued decline is expected during Ramadan. This brings the total number of Afghan returnees from Pakistan in 2017 to about 55,000 (OCHA,14 May 2017).

India

Affected areas

Jammu and Kashmir state

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 12,000 new displace-ments between 14 and 16 May

Context

As many as 12,000 people were displaced between 14 and 16 May from ten villages that fall on the line of control in Nowshera, Rajouri district, due to heavy shelling from the Pakistani army and retaliatory violence from Indian troops.  About 1,700 displaced people moved to temporary shelters set up in government secondary schools in Rajouri district, closed due to the violence (Daily Excelsior, 16 May 2017; Hindustan Times, 17 May 2017).

Iran

Affected areas

North Khorasan province

Cause of displacement

Disaster

Figures

At least 8,000 new displace-ments between 13 and 16 May

Context

At least 8,000 people were displaced between 13 and 16 May by a 5.8 magnitude earthquake which hit the outskirts of Bojnord, the capital of North Khorasan province, on 13 May. Iran is prone to frequent earthquakes, many of which have been devastating (Iranian Red Crescent, 14 May 2017; Iranian Red Crescent, 16 May 2017).

Pakistan

Affected areas

Qilla Abdullah district

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 15,000 new displace-ments between 5 and 8 May

Context

As many as 15,000 people were evacuated from border villages in Qilla Abdullah district because of firing and shelling by Afghan forces on 5 May, which spurred violent retaliations from Pakistan. The displaced people moved to a tent village in the foothills of Khojak Pass. The clashes occurred in Killi Luqman and Killi Jahangir villages which straddle the border and which Afghanistan says are in its Spin Boldak district, an assertion Pakistan denies (Tribune, 8 May 2017).

Sub-Saharan Africa

Central African Republic

Affected areas

Bambingui-Bangoran, Basse Kotto, Mbomou, Nana-Mambéré prefectures

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 29,700 new displacements between 29 April and 15 May; about 4,500 cross-border returns from Chad

Context
Bambingui-Bangoran

About 1,200 displaced people returned across the border from Chad to the prefecture between 1 and 7 May, where they are now living in difficult conditions with host families (OCHA, 8 May 2017).

Basse Kotto

More than 9,000 people were displaced on 8 and 9 May in Alindao area, Basse Kotto prefecture, because of clashes between armed groups (OCHA, 15 May 2017).

L’Ouham

More than 3,300 people (830 households) returned to l’Ouham prefecture from Chad between January and 15 May (OCHA, 8 May 2017).

Mbomou

About 700 people, the entire population of Fodé village, fled violence and the threat of kidnappings on 29 April. As many as 200 of these people arrived in Zobé-Mbari. An additional unknown number of people, almost the entire population of Balifondo, fled towards Zobé-Mbari following an attack by the Lord’s Resistance Army insurgents on 4 May (OCHA, 8 May 2017).

More than 3,000 people fled their homes between 13 and 15 May, due to violence launched by unidentified gunmen in Bangassou. Nearly 1,000 of these people hid in a mosque compound; around 1,500 in the Cathedral of Bangassou; and 500 in a hospital.

Nana-Mambéré

Around 17,000 people were displaced from Niem in Nana-Mambéré prefecture on 2 May, due to violence sparked by the earlier rustling of 600 livestock heads on 27 April (OCHA, 15 May 2017).

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Affected areas

Ituri, Kasaï, North Kivu, Tanganyika provinces

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

As many as 134,000 new displacements between 26 April and 5 May; about 25,000 secondary displacements between 29 April and 5 May

Context
Ituri

More than 12,000 people were displaced in Mahagi territory, Ituri province between 30 April and 4 May, due to clashes over land, after having returned to the area in December 2016 (OCHA, 4 May 2017).

Kasaï

At least 100,000 people were displaced in Kasaï province between 28 April and 5 May due to persistent violence, bringing the total number of IDPs in the province to 1.27 million. In less than one month, Kasaï had a 23 per cent increase in displacements, the equivalent of 8,000 new IDPs each day. Circular and multiple displacements are common in Kasaï, due to complex conflict dynamics involving clashes between government armed forces and militias, rival factions of the militia and militia in-fighting, as well as intercommunal tensions (OCHA, 5 May 2017).

North Kivu

About 10,000 people were displaced on 26 April in Masisi Territory, North Kivu province, following clashes between armed groups. A significant yet undetermined number of people continue to flee the violence, which flared up again on 15 May, forcing them to move as a preventative measure (ECHO, 5 May 2017; Radio Okapi, 15 May 2017).

Tanganyika

Up to 37,000 displaced people arrived in Kalemie city in Tanganyika province between 29 April and 5 May. This included 12,000 fleeing inter-communal violence north of Kalemie and about 25,000 people secondarily displaced from IDP sites due to insecurity (OCHA, 5 May 2017).

The start of the rainy season, an ebola outbreak in Bas-Uele Province, and poor conditions in IDP and refugee reception sites across DRC and into neighbouring countries, raise concern for aid agencies who fear the spread of viral diseases (WHO, 13 May 2017).

South Sudan

Affected areas

Lol, Wau, Upper Nile states

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 35,000 new displacements between mid-April and 9 May

Context

About 3,000 people arrived in Deleeba, Wau state, as of 29 April, following heavy fighting in Raja town, Lol state, between armed groups in mid-April. Around 7,000 more people displaced from Raja in mid-April were en route to Wau on 9 May. Fighting in Raja has left the town deserted, as the civilian population has fled to surrounding areas and across the border into Sudan (OCHA, 9 May 2017).

As many as 25,000 people were displaced from the West Bank of the Nile river between 25 April and 9 May to Aburoc, Upper Nile state, due to renewed fighting and the government offensive. Some of the displaced continued across the border into Sudan because of the threat of future attacks (OCHA, 9 May 2017).

Notes The terminology, names and designations used in this update and the material in links do not imply any opinion on the part of IDMC.
Displacement figures reported here are indicative only and have been rounded to the nearest 10 (if the figure is less than 999), 100 (if the figure is less than 10,000) or 1,000 (if the figure is 10,000 or larger).
The IDU gives priority to displacement flows that occurred or were reported in stated period. However, due to reliance on third party sources, certain entries may include information that refers to an earlier reporting period. For the purposes of this update, refugee and IDP returns do not imply the achievement of a durable solution. For IDMC-validated and peer-reviewed figures, read our Global Report on Internal Displacement.