Internal Displacement Update
Issue 27: 19 October - 15 November 2017

Issue 27 map
Feature

Iran

Affected areas

Kermanshah province

Cause of displacement

Disaster

Figures

More than 70,000 new displacements between 12 and 14 November

Context

More than 70,000 people were displaced within Kermanshah province between 12 and 14 November after a 7.3 magnitude earthquake struck the border region between Iraq and Iran. About 430 people were killed and 7,800 injured on the Iranian side of the border (Iranian Red Crescent, 13 Nov 2017; Iranian Red Crescent, 19 Nov 2017). Entire neighbourhoods were reduced to rubble in the cities of Sar Pol Zahab and Ghasr Shirin where almost 80 percent of infrastructure was destroyed. Water and electricity was cut in heavily affected areas. Landslides  triggered by the quake and its aftershocks blocked off roads and hampered the delivery of aid (Al Jazeera, 13 Nov 2017).Those forced to leave behind their destroyed homes were in dire need of shelter as night time temperatures fell below zero in Kermanshah province (BBC, 13 Nov 2017; WHO, 16 Nov 2017).

East Asia and Pacific

Indonesia

Affected areas

Aceh, Lampang, North Sumatra, Papua, South Kalimantan and West Java

Cause of displacement

Conflict, Disaster

Figures

More than 18,500 new disaster displacements between 26 October and 12 November; about 340 new conflict displacements between 9 and 17 November

Context

More than 17,000 people were evacuated following torrential rains and flooding across the provinces of Aceh, North Sumatra, South Kalimantan and West Java between 4 and 12 November. This included about 1,700 residents from Aceh province who were evacuated following flash floods (BNPB, 8 Nov 2017; BNPB, 12 Nov 2017). Similarly, about 1,500 people were evacuated in Lampang Province on 26 October when houses and schools were inundated with over two metres of water (ASEAN AHA Centre, 26 Oct 2017).

About 1,300 people were trapped in the villages of Kimbeli and Banti in Papua province between 7 and 9 November by armed separatists who occupied the area around Freeport’s mine. Of those initially trapped in their villages, about 340 people were evacuated between 9 and 17 November (ABC News, 9 Nov 2017; Reuters, 9 Nov 2017; Reuters, 17 Nov 2017Washington Post, 17 Nov 2017).

Japan

Affected areas

Chiba, Ehime, Gifu, Hyogo, Ibaraki, Kagawa, Kyoto, Mie, Nara, Oita, Osaka, Saitama, Shiga, Shizuoka, Tokushima, Tokyo, Wakayama Tottori, Yamaguchi, and Yamanashi

Cause of displacement

Disaster

Figures

More than 11,000 new displacements between 22 and 24 October

Context

More than 11,000 people were evacuated to shelters on 23 October after Typhoon Lan made landfall bringing heavy rain, strong winds and storm surge. More than 200,000 people received evacuation orders, however only those in evacuation shelters were confirmed to have left their homes. The evacuees were spread across shelters in the prefectures of Chiba, Ehime, Gifu, Hyogo, Ibaraki, Kagawa, Kyoto, Mie, Nara, Oita, Osaka, Saitama, Shiga, Shizuoka, Tokushima, Tokyo, Wakayama Tottori, Yamaguchi, and Yamanashi (ECHO, 23 Oct 2017; Cabinet Office, 23 Oct 2017; ECHO, 24 Oct 2017).

Malaysia

Affected areas

Johor, Kedah, Penang, Sabah, Selangor

Cause of displacement

Disaster

Figures

More than 16,000 new displacements between 18 October and 15 November

Context

As many as 4,200 people were evacuated on 18 October due to floods in Sabah state on Borneo island that inundated the town of Kota Belud and villages along the Kadamaian river (ASEAN AHA Centre, 18 Oct 2017; NADMA, 30 Oct 2017).  About 70 people were evacuated following a landslide in Kampung Kolam Damai, Sabah state, on 20 October (New Straits Times, 20 Oct 2017; NADMA, 13 Nov 2017).

In the northwest of the Malaysian peninsula, more than 11,000 people were displaced to evacuation shelters in Penang and Kedah states between 6 and 12 November because of flooding and strong winds brought on by Typhoon Damrey. Flood levels rose as high as three to four metres in some areas of Penang island where the Chief Minister described the storm as the worst in Penang’s history (Floodlist, 6 Nov 2017; OCHA, 12 Nov 2017).

About 580 people were evacuated between 14 and 15 November in Johor, Selangor and Kedah states due to flooding (NADMA, 15 Nov 2017; NADMA, 15 Nov 2017; NADMA, 15 Nov 2017).

Philippines

Affected areas

Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), Bicol (V), Cagayan (II), Caraga (XIII), Central Luzon (III), Central Visayas (VII), Soccsksargen (XII), Western Visayas (VI) and Zamboanga (IX)

Cause of displacement

Disaster

Figures

As many as 171,000 new displacements between 15 October and 12 November

Context

More than 130,000 people were displaced between 15 and 27 October because of gale force winds, heavy rains, flash floods and landslides brought on by Typhoon Lan (locally named Paolo) (DROMIC, 27 Oct 2017). The majority of evacuees stayed with family and friends within ARMM, Western Visayas, Central Visayas, Zamboanga, Soccsksargen and Caraga.

About 3,400 people were forced to leave their homes on the island provinces of Tawi-Tawi and in Sulu, ARMM, between 15 and 24 October as gale force winds generated storm surges (DROMIC, 24 Oct 2017).

About 185 people were displaced between 2 and 11 November in Cebu province, Central Visayas due to a landslide (DROMIC, 11 Nov 2017).

As many as 35,000 people were forced to evacuate between 5 and 7 November after heavy rains and flash floods submerged 500 low-lying villages in the provinces of Cagayan and Isabela in the Cagayan Valley region. Most stayed with friends or relatives (DROMIC, 7 Nov 2017; Inquirer, 7 Nov 2017).

About 2,250 people were displaced between 9 and 12 November in the provinces of Aurora, Central Luzon and Camarines Sur in Bicol region due heavy rains and flooding from Tropical Storm Haikui (locally named Salome) (DROMIC, 12 Nov 2017).

Vietnam

Affected areas

Khanh Hoa, Ninh Thuan, Phu Yen

Cause of displacement

Disaster

Figures

About 35,000 new displacements between 3 and 11 November

Context

About 35,000 people were displaced to evacuation centres between 3 and 11 November because of Typhoon Damrey which made landfall on the morning of 4 November (AHA Centre, 11 November 2017). This included about 19,000 people in Khanh Hoa Province, more than 10,000 people in Ninh Thuan Province and 6,200 people in Phu Yen Province (AHA Centre, 11 November 2017). Fourteen provinces and four million people in central-south Viet Nam were affected by strong winds and heavy rainfall brought on by the typhoon (AHA Centre, 11 November 2017).

Latin America and the Caribbean

Honduras

Affected areas

Atlantida, Colon, Cortes, Gracias a Dios, Islas de la Bahia and Yoro departments

Cause of displacement

Disaster

Figures

As many as 27,000 new displacements between 23 and 28 October

Context

As many as 27,000 people were evacuated between 23 and 28 October as the first cold front of the season brought heavy rains which caused rivers and gorges to flood. Of those evacuated, about 16,700 were accommodated in collective relief centres (IFRC, 8 Nov 2017).

Middle East and North Africa

Iraq

Affected areas

Halabja and Sulaymaniyah governorates

Cause of displacement

Disaster

Figures

More than 1,900 new displacements between 12 and 14 November

Context

More than 1,900 people (300 families) were displaced between 12 and 15 November after a 7.3 magnitude earthquake struck just south of Halabja city on the border with Iran (IRCS, 16 Nov 2017; Al Jazeera, 13 Nov 2017). It was felt in the Kurdish cities of Erbil, Duhok, Halabja and Sulaimaniyah where at least eight people were killed and 525 injured (WHO, 16 Nov 2017). The quake was followed by hundreds of aftershocks. The Iraqi Red Crescent said that tents had been set up in Sulaymaniyah governorate to house more than 300 families displaced by the quake (Iraqi Red Crescent, 16 Nov 2017).

South Asia

Afghanistan

Affected areas

Countrywide

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

As many as 42,000 new displacements between 23 October and 12 November; about 55,000 returns between 15 October and 12 November

Context

As many as 42,000 people were newly displaced by conflict in Afghanistan between 23 October and 12 November. This included three significant flows of people in the east, north and north-east of the country which took place between 22 and 28 October. The first, about 18,000 people, fled fighting in the east between non-state armed groups, leaving behind their homes in Khogyani, Ghazni province and Nangarhar province. The second flow involved 10,000 people who were displaced to Balkh and Sar-e-Pul provinces from Faryab, Jawzjan, Sar-e-Pul, Baghlan and Kunduz provinces. In addition, 7,300 people were forced to flee violence within Kunduz province, including to and from Emam Saheb city and to Kunduz city from the districts of Char Dara, Dasht-e-Archi and Emam Saheb. The province sheltering the highest numbers of IDPs in Afghanistan as of 12 November is Nangarhar followed by Kunduz, Badghis and Baghlan (OCHA, 30 Oct 2017; 5 Nov 2017 and 13 Nov 2017).

Amid these new displacements, as many as 52,000 undocumented Afghans returned from Iran between 15 October and 12 November, primarily through the Milak (Nimroz) and Herat (Islam Qala) border crossings. An additional 2,900 Afghans returned from Pakistan via the Torkham and Spin Boldak border crossings over the same period (IOM, 25 Oct 2017; IOM, 31 Oct 2017; IOM, 12 Nov 2017).

Sub-Saharan Africa

Central African Republic

Affected areas

Mbomou, Nana Gribizi, Ouham and Ouham-Pende prefectures

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

More than 28,000 new displacements between 18 October and 13 November

Context

As many as 18,000 people were displaced between 18 and 23 October when armed groups entered the town of Pomolo in Mbomou prefecture, killing around 100 people. Of those displaced, about 3,000 people from neighbouring Dimbi town made pendular movements in and out of the town each night for fear of attacks by armed groups as the violence persisted (OCHA, 23 Oct 2017).

About 1,800 people (450 households) fled into the bush from Bamatara village along the Kaga-Bandoro - Botto road in Nana Gribizi prefecture between 18 and 23 October, due to the incursion of an armed group on the village (OCHA, 23 Oct 2017).

About 3,000 people, largely women and children, fled Boko town in Ouham-Pende on 15 October after an armed group took the town under siege (OCHA, 23 Oct 2017). An additional 700 people fled abuse from armed groups in the locality of Benakmor to Paoua town between the end of October and 13 November (OCHA, 13 Nov 2017).

About 5,000 people were displaced from the northern outskirts of Batangafo, Ouham prefecture, into the town between 7 and 13 November due to clashes between armed groups.

The country has seen a surge in violence over the past year with recurrent clashes triggering displacements across several regions (OCHA, 13 Nov 2017).

Democratic Republic of Congo

Affected areas

Bas-Uele, Ituri, Maniema, South Kivu

Cause of displacement

Conflict, Disaster

Figures

More than 40,000 new conflict displacements between 10 October and 14 November; about 3,500 new disaster displacements between 24 October and 8 November; and about 21,000 returns between 9 October and 14 November

Context

More than 25,000 people were displaced by fighting between two militia groups in Kazabu close to Kabambare territory in Maniema province on 24 October. That same day, about 2,300 people were displaced by a violent storm that destroyed their homes in Kasongo (OCHA, 31 Oct 2017).

More than 14,000 people were displaced by fighting between armed groups and government forces in South Kivu province between 10 October and 14 November. Of those displaced, about 5,000 people fled Shabunda territory between 10 and 18 October, some crossing into neighbouring Maniema province (OCHA, 24 Oct 2017). Similar clashes forced 5,800 people to flee Fizi territory and 3,300 people to flee Lulenge between 7 and 14 November (OCHA, 14 Nov 2017). About 21,000 people returned to their areas of origin in South Kivu province between 9 October and 14 November, including about 18,000 people to Kalehe territory, 1,200 people to Makobola-Mboko in Fizi territory and 2,000 to Shabunda territory. Returnees to Fizi and Shabunda had been hiding out in the bush since late October waiting for a lull in clashes between government forces and armed groups (OCHA, 24 Oct 2017; OCHA, 31 Oct 2017; OCHA, 14 Nov 2017).

In Ituri province, more than 1,200 people fled intercommunal violence and fear of violent reprisals between 24 October and 8 November, triggered by a dispute over farm lands in the Jupajalafuru and Jupagiju localities. In the same province, villages were emptied and an unknown number of people displaced as the military launched an operation against fighters from the Ituri Armed Front for Patriotic Resistance (OCHA, 8 Nov 2017).

More than 1,200 people were displaced by flooding that submerged over 240 houses in Aketi city, Bas-Uele province, between 5 and 8 November. Those displaced by the flooding stayed with host families as they waited for the flood waters to recede on 8 November (Radio Okapi, 8 Nov 2017).

South Sudan

Affected areas

Central Equatoria

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

As many as 17,000 new displacements between 18 and 31 October

Context

As many as 17,000 people were secondarily displaced from Ajio, Keriwa and Logo IDP camps in Kajo-Keji town, Central Equatoria, between 18 and 31 October because of clashes between government and opposition forces as well as fighting between rebel groups. Fighting over the strategic town has seen multiple bouts of violence during the year. As the clashes reached IDP settlements in late October, people fled towards villages close to the Ugandan border. Some IDPs crossed into Uganda, while others stayed on the South Sudanese side of the border unsure where to go next (OCHA, 13 Nov 2017; CCCM, 31 Oct 2017; Radio Tamazuj, 6 Nov 2017; Xinhua, 23 Oct 2017). “We are stuck,” a 23 year old mother told Voice of America news, “if we go to the refugee camps in Uganda, life is full of suffering, the food isn’t given out on time, but if I decide to go back to South Sudan, I will be forced to run away from death” (VOA News, 7 Nov 2017).

Notes For the purposes of this update, refugee and IDP returns do not imply the achievement of a durable solution. The terminology, names and designations used in this update and the material in links do not imply any opinion on the part of IDMC.
Displacement figures reported here are indicative only and have been rounded to the nearest 10 (if the figure is less than 999), 100 (if the figure is less than 10,000) or 1,000 (if the figure is 10,000 or larger).
The IDU gives priority to displacement flows that occurred or were reported in stated period. However, due to reliance on third party sources, certain entries may include information that refers to an earlier reporting period. For the purposes of this update, refugee and IDP returns do not imply the achievement of a durable solution. For IDMC-validated and peer-reviewed figures, read our Global Report on Internal Displacement.