Internal Displacement Update
Issue 9: 12 - 25 January 2017

Issue 9 map
Feature

Nigeria

Affected areas

Rann

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

Between 90 and 230 IDPs killed

Context

Between 90 and 230 IDPs were killed on 17 January when the Nigerian air force accidentally bombed a displacement camp in Rann, in north-eastern Nigeria, while targeting Boko Haram militants (Le Monde, 24 January 2017). The overall situation continues to be of concern, with tens of thousands of displaced people in Rann struggling with severe food shortages and high levels of malnutrition (OCHA, 19 January 2017).

The UN Special Rapporteur on the human rights of internally displaced persons, Cecilia Jimenez-Damary, expressed dismay at the bombing. “This tragedy should never have happened and brings into stark focus the perilous situation that many internally displaced persons continue to experience in this region of Nigeria. The safety of IDPs must be guaranteed,” she said (OHCHR, 19 January 2017).

East Asia and Pacific

Malaysia

Affected areas

Almost all states

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Floods)

Figures

More than 15,000 new displacements between 18 and 25 January

Context

More than 15,000 people were evacuated in Kelantan, Johor, Perak, Selangor, Malacca and Sabah states because of heavy rain that caused floods (ECHO, 25 January 2017). The floods affected nearly all states (The Straits Times, 25 January 2017).

Thailand

Affected areas

Southern regions

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Floods)

Figures

As many as 1,800 new displacements between 1 December and 25 January

Context

As many as 1,800 people were evacuated because of extensive flooding in the south of the country (IFRC disaster update, 25 January 2017, on file with IDMC). The floods came after unseasonably heavy rain, the worst in 30 years, hit 12 out of 67 provinces. The floods left thousands stranded in their homes (ECHO, 10 January 2017). In some areas, such as Nakorn Sri Thammarat province, villages were isolated and only accessible by boat (IFRC, 18 January 2017).

The Philippines

Affected areas

Visayas and Mindanao island groups

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Storm)

Figures

About 46,000 new displacements between 18 and 25 January

Context

About 46,000 people were evacuated in Visayas and Mindanao islands because heavy rain between 18 and 25 January caused floods and landslides. A state of calamity was declared in Davao del Norte (ECHO, 25 January 2017). Also in Mindanao, 1,900 people were still in nine evacuation centres on 13 January after being displaced by tropical depression 01W (local name Auring) which made landfalls on 8 and 9 January (OCHA, 16 January 2017).

Europe and Central Asia

United Kingdom

Affected areas

Essex, Norfolk, Suffolk

Cause of displacement

Disaster (Storm surge and flood)

Figures

About 14,000 new displacements on 13 and 14 January.

Context

More than 5,000 homes were evacuated in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, after fears of a storm surge and flooding because of high winds and high spring tides between 13 and 14 January. In Essex, about 140 people took shelter in an education centre in Clacton and more than 200 people took shelter at a rest centre in Jaywick. On the Norfolk coast, 80 homes were evacuated in Walcott. A further 1,800 residents were evacuated in East Suffolk (BBC 14 January 2017 and 14 January 2017).

Latin America and the Caribbean

Colombia

Affected areas

Tumaco, Nariño

Cause of displacement

Violence

Figures

About 400 new displacements on 5 January

Context

About 400 people (107 families) from the town of Pital de la Conta in the south-east sought refuge with friends and family after a group of 20 armed men took control of the town on 5 January (OCHA, 14 January 2017). Some analysts predicted armed groups would compete for power after the government signed a peace deal with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in August 2016 (Foreign Policy, 25 August 2016).

Middle East and North Africa

Syria

Affected areas

Aleppo, Idlib, Rural Damascus, Wadi Barada

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

More than 56,000 returns to Aleppo between 1 and 12 January; at least 15,000 new displacements from Wadi Barada between 15 December and 14 January; 51,000 people from eastern Aleppo remain displaced in western Aleppo as at 12 January

Context

Approximately half of the 111,000 people displaced from Aleppo between 24 November and 30 December returned to their homes in east Aleppo in early January as the security situation remained relatively calm. As of 12 January, more than 56,000 returnees were officially registered in east Aleppo. Most were scattered across various neighbourhoods with Hanano hosting the largest number of returnees (13,000). Most people returned to at least partially damaged houses. About 51,000 people from east Aleppo were registered as sheltering in west Aleppo (OCHA 12 January 2017).

At least 15,000 people were displaced from Wadi Barada by conflict between 15 December and 14 January. They fled mostly to Al-Rawda, Al-Tkiyeh, Zabadani Plain and the Dimas areas (OCHA, 14 January 2017).

Iraq

Affected areas

Mosul

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 160,000 new displacements and 23,000 returns between 17 October and 25 January

Context

About 160,000 people were displaced from Mosul due to fighting between the Iraqi army and Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) for control of the city (IOM automated dashboard, 25 January 2017). As of 20 January, about 23,000 displaced people had returned to areas retaken by government forces since 17 October (UNHCR, 20 January 2017).

Displaced people revealed increasingly difficult journeys with many having to walk for hours, while others used boats to reach safety. Allegations also emerged that people fleeing Hawija and Shirqat were abducted en route, based on suspicions of their affiliation with armed groups (UNHCR, 20 January 2017).

Tens of thousands of the newly displaced people struggled to find adequate warmth in tents and sub-standard shelters as parts of Iraq (and Syria) were hit by snow storms (UNHCR, 22 January 2017). Acute respiratory tract infections, acute diarrhoea and skin diseases were the most common medical problems in late November 2016 (EWARN, 27 November 2016).

South Asia

Afghanistan

Affected areas

Farah, Faryab, Ghor, Herat, Helmand, Kandahar, Nangahar, Nimroz

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 2,000 new displacements between 1 and 8 January; about 9,000 returns from Iran and Pakistan between 15 and 21 January

Context

About 2,000 people fled their homes in five provinces between 1 and 8 January due to conflict. Constrained humanitarian access hindered verification of the full level of displacement (OCHA, 22 January 2017). People fled fighting by ISIL, the Taliban and government forces, which are battling for control of territory (IRIN, 10 January 2017).

About 9,000 undocumented Afghans returned from Iran and Pakistan between 15 and 21 January. The total number of such returnees from Pakistan between 1 January 2016 and 21 January 2017 is now 253,000. The number of returnees from Iran during the same period is 469,000 (IOM, 23 January 2017).

Pakistan

Affected areas

Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA)

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 6,700 returns between 6 to 12 January

Context

About 6,700 people returned to FATA between 6 and 12 January, bringing the total for 2017 to more than 13,000 families. Between 16 March 2015 and 12 January 2017, approximately 1.6 million people returned but about 489,000 remain displaced (OCHA, 12 January 2017). Some of the displaced families also “camped across the border in Afghanistan”. Some IDPs were reluctant to return even though their home areas had been designated non-conflict areas. Reasons included a lack of infrastructure, “sectarian issues” and harsh winter conditions. The government announced on 5 January it would deregister displaced families who did not return after being given four weeks’ notice (Dawn, 6 January 2017).

Sub-Saharan Africa

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Affected areas

Tanganyika province

Cause of displacement

Conflict

Figures

About 15,000 new displacements near Manono between 3 and 11 January

Context

About 15,000 people fled communal violence between 3 and 11 January, 90 kilometres south of Manono in Tanganyika province. This brings to 332,000 the number of people displaced in the province, half of them in the three months to 11 January (OCHA, 11 January 2017). Civil society organisations said the conflict was driven by inequalities between the Twa people and Luba, a Bantu ethnic group. Between July 2016 and January 2017, the province registered more than 42,000 displaced households (Anadolu Agency, 17 January 2017).

Thousands of IDPs are living with host families, in public buildings, schools and churches in Manono. Living conditions are very precarious for both the local and the displaced populations (MSF, 23 January 2017).

Gambia

Affected areas

Country-wide

Cause of displacement

Violence

Figures

More than 160,000 new displacements between 1 and 24 January

Context

More than 160,000 people, mainly women and children, fled the capital, Banjul, for their home villages, fearing violence after long-time president, Yahya Jammeh, refused to stand down after losing the general election on 1 December (United Purpose, 22 January 2017; unpublished email, 1 February 2017, on file with IDMC).

Notes The terminology, names and designations used in this update and the material in links do not imply any opinion on the part of IDMC.
Displacement figures reported here are indicative only and have been rounded to the nearest 100 (if the total is less than 10,000) or 1,000 (if the figure is 10,000 or larger). For IDMC-validated and peer-reviewed figures, read our Global Report on Internal Displacement.