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IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Angola

The ceasefire agreed between the Angolan government and UNITA in 2002 ended 27 years of civil war and provided the momentum for millions of internally displaced people (IDPs) to return home. More than four million people were displaced before the ceasefire. In early 2004, 450,000 of them were still waiting to go back to their homes, while around 400,000 were expected to settle permanently in their current place of residence. The majority of those IDPs who were able to return have faced a lack of basic services and food insecurity, as well a widespread threat of land mines.

30 March 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Burundi

Since the early 1990s, hundreds of thousands of Burundians have fled their homes to escape fighting between the government and Hutu rebel groups seeking to put an end to the political dominance of the Tutsi minority.

26 March 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Solomon Islands

In spite of a peace agreement in 2000, ending the civil war which forcibly displaced nearly ten per cent of the population of the Solomon Islands, a general climate of instability and insecurity has continued to prevail in many areas of the country, particularly on Guadalcanal, the country’s main island.

18 March 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Georgia

Tens of thousands of people displaced from Georgia's secessionist territories of Abkhazia and South Ossetia have been waiting to return home for more than a decade. Since a ceasefire was enforced in South Ossetia and Abkhazia in 1992, more than 200,000 people have lived in precarious conditions, mostly accommodated in collective centres dependent on meagre state benefits.

18 March 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Sudan: Profile of Internal Displacement (March 2004)

Since the 1980s, the conflict ravaging Sudan has generated the world's largest internally displaced population. Over four million people have fled their homes to escape fighting between government troops, the Sudan People's Liberation Movement/Army (SPLM/A) and several smaller militia groups.

15 March 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Republic of Moldova

Following its independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, Moldova - one of the poorest countries in Europe - faced its own internal secessionist uprising as the Russian and Ukrainian population in the Transdniestrian region sort independence. The armed conflict internally displaced up to 51,000 people and forced up to 80,000 people to seek refuge in third countries, mainly in neighbouring Ukraine.

11 March 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Afghanistan

A government decision to cancel elections in 1991 sparked off fighting between government forces and Islamist groups that ravaged Algeria throughout the 1990s. As government forces gained control in the major towns, armed attacks, massacres and large-scale human rights violations continued in rural areas, leading to massive displacement from the countryside to the outskirts of nearby cities. The precise number of Algerians displaced by the political violence is impossible to assess given the information void that has pervaded the conflict in Algeria since its onset.

04 March 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Profile in Internal Displacement: Serbia & Montenegro

More than 225,000 internally displaced people (IDPs) – mainly ethnic Serbs and Roma who fled Kosovo when Yugoslav forces withdrew in 1999 – are still waiting to return from Serbia and Montenegro to their pre-war homes in the now UN-administered province. Although the ethnic Albanian majority in Kosovo generally appears to have become more tolerant vis-à-vis the return of the displaced and an operational framework has been put in place to facilitate returns, a number of obstacles still prevent IDPs from going back to their places of origin.

03 March 2004 | Country Profile

Republic of Moldova: Uncertainty about the integration of displaced from the Transdniestrian region

Following its independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, Moldova - one of the poorest countries in Europe - faced its own internal secessionist uprising as the Russian and Ukrainian population in the Transdniestrian region sought independence.

01 March 2004 | Overview

Fear prevents remaining IDPs from returning home

To ensure the success of returns in the country, it is necessary that the national authorities and the international community continue to monitor the needs of the remaining displaced population

26 February 2004 | Overview

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Macedonia

Macedonia has been regarded as a “success story” for having achieved the fastest returns of people displaced by conflict in the Balkans. Over 95 per cent of the people uprooted during the brief but intense conflict between ethnic Albanian armed groups and Macedonian security forces in 2001 have been able to return.

26 February 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Iraq (February 2004)

The collapse of the regime of Saddam Hussein following the US-led war in Iraq in March 2003 created the political conditions for the 800,000 Kurds who had been forcibly displaced under a brutal policy of “Arabisation” to return to their homes.

19 February 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Colombia

Displacement has been an endemic feature of the 40-year long conflict in Colombia, and over three million Colombians have been displaced since 1985. The IDP crisis has become one of the world's worst, disproportionately affecting Afro-Colombians and indigenous people, who make up some of the country’s poorest people.

04 February 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Afghanistan: Return of IDPs constrained by insecurity, land disputes and lack of aid

Persistent insecurity in many areas of the country and disputes related to land and property are major constraints to IDP return. The huge wave of IDPs returning home in 2002 has not been sustained during 2003, mainly because of continued instability, poor economic progress and harsh living conditions. Some 400,000 IDPs returned home in 2002, the majority without any assistance.

03 February 2004 | Overview

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Afghanistan (February 2004)

Persistent insecurity in many areas of the country and disputes related to land and property are major constraints to IDP return. The huge wave of IDPs returning home in 2002 has not been sustained during 2003, mainly because of continued instability, poor economic progress and harsh living conditions. Some 400,000 IDPs returned home in 2002, the majority without any assistance.

02 February 2004 | Country Profile

Activity Report 2003

IDMC’s (formerly, the Global IDP Project) Activity Report for the year 2003

01 February 2004 | Publication

Appeal 2004 and Future Strategy

IDMC’s (formerly, the Global IDP Project) Appeal for the year 2004.

01 February 2004 | Publication

Internal Displacement: A Global Overview of Trends and Developments in 2003

IDMC’s flagship annual report on the major global and regional developments in internal displacement due to conflict and violence throughout the year – includes both figures and analysis.

01 February 2004 | Publication

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Bosnia and Herzegovina

Eight years after the signing of the Dayton Peace Agreement, there are still 330,000 people internally displaced in Bosnia-Herzegovina. While the international community has largely succeeded in implementing the right of displaced people and refugees to return in Bosnia-Herzegovina the plight of many internally displaced people remains unresolved.

28 January 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Russian Federation

Attempts by the Russian federal authorities to stabilise the military, political and socio-economic situation in Chechnya during 2003 have so far failed to reduce levels of violence in the province to allow for the safe return of the more than 200,000 people who remain internally displaced.

15 January 2004 | Country Profile

IDMC

Profile of Internal Displacement: Pakistan

For more than thirty years, repeated military stand-offs and intensive shelling between Indian and Pakistani military forces have temporarily displaced thousands of people living along the Pakistani side of the Line of Control that has divided Kashmir since 1972. The number of internally displaced increased dramatically when the conflict between India and Pakistan intensified in 2002.

14 January 2004 | Country Profile

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